3.04.2018

The Inertial Field Defined

An inertial field is a spiral magnetic field that arises from orbiting magnets.  The sun is a prime example of this.  Likely there are dipoles (3 it appears from studying the "heliospheric current sheet 2001 till 2009" video on youtube) orbiting each other in the sun producing the interplanetary magnetic field which combined with the solar wind produces  the heliospheric current sheet.

These magnets can be oriented in any fashion but  most likely will end upbeing   parallel with the north poles aligned.



Here is a view from the top if they were instead perpendicular.



The key about this is that as the magnets orbit each-other there is produced a spiral magnetic field which can in theory significantly increase the reach of the field.  Kind of like rifling the barrel of a gun.

The reason it is named "inertial" field is because it takes inertia to keep magnetic dipoles like this from joining together.  The magnets would tend to want to "stick" together.  But with centrifugal force (inertia) from rotation the dipoles are kept separated.  The magnetic attraction likely produces the centripetal force keeping the dipoles together.  Suns, star clusters, galaxies, even black holes are the same according to this theory, they are all just varying degrees of inertial field generators.  The inertial field is likely what makes life and all physical laws including gravity.


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