8.03.2018

Make your own natural Gasoline Alternative

 UPDATED RECIPE:

86 octane equivalent recipe: (with methanol at $1.13 a gallon (large quantities) and canola oil $6/gal at walmart, comes out to $1.79 a gallon.  However more of this mixture will need to be used per mile so MPG will go down or the speed you can go will decrease if you are using the same amount of fuel.)

74% methanol or ethanol
16% canola oil (cheapest but any oil can be used in similar quantities)
0.1g potassium hydroxide (or equivalent moles of NaOH or Ammonium hydroxide or other alkali)

(canola oil may dissolve easier if starting with less methanol than the full amount to dissolve the potassium hydroxide and oil)

Another option is to mix biodiesel with alcohol.  15% Biodiesel and 75% alcohol gives 87 Octane.  I call any biodiesel/alcohol mixture BioGo.  It can include also limonene or any other non polar solvent at any percent but preferably 1-5%.  This addition will reduce the vapor pressure (evaporate less) and perhaps have other benefits. 

https://patents.google.com/patent/US4915707


First recipie:
per 100g

70g methanol
30g vegetable oil preferably coconut or peanut
0.2g potassium hydroxide

make certain pH is 7 if not add a bit more oil.If cloudy heat a little to get to dissolve.  Also test that it doesn't become cloudy when put in the freezer.  If it does add more methanol (or a teeny tiny bit of lye if you don't want to mess up the ratio {which hasn't been tested btw, any ratio of oil to methanol or ethanol is allowed in this invention and can vary depending on octane needed and cetane/octane values of the ingredients}. Also sodium hydroxide, ammonium hydroxide, or any other soluble alkali can be used to saponify the oil.  If the car's idle is too high, then add more alcohol.  If the idle is too low, add more oil.


So a couple years ago I made a 15% turpentine 85% peanut oil blend and ran a diesel engine off of it very smoothly.  My goal was to produce a water based diesel fuel but I never really got to the experiments.  I never really thought of making an alternative fuel for gasoline engines, mostly because I know that diesel was designed to run on vegetable oil so I figured that was a better platform.

Problem is diesel engines are just not that common or cheap. Gasoline engines are.  And I finally know enough to be able to design such a fuel.

Ethanol and Methanol are great fuels.  The problem is they just aren't "thick" enough to run on an unmodified engine.  Well why not add some heavier oils?  Say a dash of coconut or peanut oil?  So instead of turpentine thinned oil for diesel, we can make oil thickened alcohol for gas engines.  The problem is oil doesn't dissolve very well in alcohol.  Well just add a little lye to help it dissolve.

Here is a sample recipe (untested) *WARNING DO NOT USE IN ENGINE THAT CONTAINS ALUMINUM OR FIND A WAY TO NEUTRALIZE THE PH SUFFICIENTLY*:

90% methanol/ethanol
5% limonene/turpentine
 4.9% Natural oil
~0.1% Lye
mix until all is dissolved
(make sure the solution is roughly pH 7 before using)

You can even omit the oil and lye and just use non-polar solvents like turpentine/mineral spirits and/or limonene to thicken the alcohol.  Make the percentage equal to the octane you desire.  This works because alcohol is higher octane than gasoline and these non-polar solvents are lower octane than gasoline.

Why the limonene or turpentine?  Why not.  Makes it smell nice, mixes with the alcohol well, and probably would help dissolve carbon deposits.  Win-win right?

This will likely be the cleanest burning personal transportation fuel ever invented since alcohol burns so nicely with extremely low emissions.  A car running this would pass any emissions test with no exhaust gas return or catalytic converter.

Cetane of vegetable oils
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00814899/file/CHARACTERISTICS_OF_VEGETABLE_OILS_FOR_USE_AS_FUEL_IN_STATIONARY_DIESEL_ENGINES_-_TOWARDS_SPECIFICATIONS_FOR_A_STANDARD_IN_WEST_AFRICA.pdf

cetane vs octane opposite
https://www.agriculture.com/machinery/fuels/what-you-need-to-know-about-fuels-cete_249-ar50586

methanol/ethanol 108.7 octane
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octane_rating

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